I spend my time answering very important questions to very unimportant people. I'm not even talking about my callers. I'm going through stuff so I'm fucking cranky.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from black-culture  22 notes
agwunderconstruction:

Brooklyn Museum 
Target First Saturdays and enjoy engaging and eclectic free art and entertainment programs every month, from 5 to 11 p.m. Michelin-starred Saul restaurant and bar is open all evening. The Counter café serves sandwiches, salads, and sweets, as well as wine and local beer. Parking is a flat rate of $5 starting at 5 p.m. (All other Saturdays, we close at 6 p.m.)

Social Club
8–10 p.m.
Global Rhythms leads rumba and salsa lessons; Brooklyn Street Art presents an interactive mural by Don Rimx. Try your hand at dominoes, watch aPimp My Piragua encore, then sip a specialty cocktail at the bar. Open to ages 16 and over.


Kids Corner
8:15 p.m.
Join Felix Pitre for an interactive program that uses music, storytelling, puppetry, and instruments to bring the culture of Latin America to life.


Discussion
8:30 p.m.
Organizers from Make the Road talk about their social justice work with immigrants of Latino descent in Brooklyn. Free tickets (25) available at the Visitor Center at 7:30 p.m.


Music
9 p.m.
The duo Los Rakas performs a fresh mix of hip-hop, plena, reggae, and dancehall, with Spanish and English lyricism and cutting-edge Pan-American flows.

agwunderconstruction:

Brooklyn Museum 

Target First Saturdays and enjoy engaging and eclectic free art and entertainment programs every month, from 5 to 11 p.m. Michelin-starred Saul restaurant and bar is open all evening. The Counter café serves sandwiches, salads, and sweets, as well as wine and local beer. Parking is a flat rate of $5 starting at 5 p.m. (All other Saturdays, we close at 6 p.m.)

Social Club

8–10 p.m.

Global Rhythms leads rumba and salsa lessons; Brooklyn Street Art presents an interactive mural by Don Rimx. Try your hand at dominoes, watch aPimp My Piragua encore, then sip a specialty cocktail at the bar. Open to ages 16 and over.

Kids Corner

8:15 p.m.

Join Felix Pitre for an interactive program that uses music, storytelling, puppetry, and instruments to bring the culture of Latin America to life.

Discussion

8:30 p.m.

Organizers from Make the Road talk about their social justice work with immigrants of Latino descent in Brooklyn. Free tickets (25) available at the Visitor Center at 7:30 p.m.

Music

9 p.m.

The duo Los Rakas performs a fresh mix of hip-hop, plena, reggae, and dancehall, with Spanish and English lyricism and cutting-edge Pan-American flows.
Reblogged from mydrunkkitchen  60,955 notes

wheresagnes:

aztec-princesss:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

*runs to target- i need to get my babydoll one for her 1st bday

ohmygosh and the one from Ethiopia has natural hair which you can’t get from the American Girl “just like you” dolls!

Reblogged from mydrunkkitchen  4,065 notes

floozys:

i want to see more girl underachievers who are comedically lazy but have a heart of gold and can achieve things they thought they couldn’t when they really try like there are millions of guy characters like this and i can’t think of even one girl

Reblogged from black-culture  19,423 notes
thepoliticalfreakshow:

Remembering African-American Victims Injured By Police Brutality In America
Rev. Earl Baldwin Jr. (Pennsylvania): Tased By Pittsburgh Police While Praying & Giving Last Respects For His Deceased Stepson In A Hospital, Survived The Taser Attack, Has Now Sued Pittsburgh In A Civil Rights Lawsuit Over The Tasing
Reverend Earl Baldwin Jr. of Pittsburgh filed a civil rights lawsuit against police after they allegedly restrained and tased him in a hospital emergency room. Baldwin claims he was trying to pay his last respects to his dead stepson when the incident occurred.
According to Baldwin, he was trying to pray for 23-year-old Mileek Grissom in the UPMC Mercy Hospital, when officers pulled him away and tased him. “I needed to tell him his family was going to be OK,” Baldwin explained to WPXI. “I was going to do everything I could to make sure they were OK.”
Video from a hospital camera shows a distraught Baldwin handcuffed and surrounded by several officers trying to pull him away from his son, and one of the officers shooting him in the back with a taser. Officers say Baldwin was interfering while doctors tried to revive Grissom, but a family attorney says Grissom was dead and not being treated at the time.

The police department has not issued a statement about the lawsuit, but UPMC refutes Baldwin’s claim. “Clearly this was a stressful situation and a tragic loss for this family,” it said. “However, the allegations about the circumstances are inaccurate.”

Tori Baldwin, Grissom’s mother, was denied entry into the hospital at the time.
Source: Carimah Townes for ThinkProgress

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Remembering African-American Victims Injured By Police Brutality In America

Rev. Earl Baldwin Jr. (Pennsylvania): Tased By Pittsburgh Police While Praying & Giving Last Respects For His Deceased Stepson In A Hospital, Survived The Taser Attack, Has Now Sued Pittsburgh In A Civil Rights Lawsuit Over The Tasing

Reverend Earl Baldwin Jr. of Pittsburgh filed a civil rights lawsuit against police after they allegedly restrained and tased him in a hospital emergency room. Baldwin claims he was trying to pay his last respects to his dead stepson when the incident occurred.

According to Baldwin, he was trying to pray for 23-year-old Mileek Grissom in the UPMC Mercy Hospital, when officers pulled him away and tased him. “I needed to tell him his family was going to be OK,” Baldwin explained to WPXI. “I was going to do everything I could to make sure they were OK.”

Video from a hospital camera shows a distraught Baldwin handcuffed and surrounded by several officers trying to pull him away from his son, and one of the officers shooting him in the back with a taser. Officers say Baldwin was interfering while doctors tried to revive Grissom, but a family attorney says Grissom was dead and not being treated at the time.

The police department has not issued a statement about the lawsuit, but UPMC refutes Baldwin’s claim. “Clearly this was a stressful situation and a tragic loss for this family,” it said. “However, the allegations about the circumstances are inaccurate.”

Tori Baldwin, Grissom’s mother, was denied entry into the hospital at the time.

Source: Carimah Townes for ThinkProgress